Exciting and Interesting Motivates More Than Money

Mother Nature was not cooperating with the huge business of Anchorage, Alaska’s 1,100 mile Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race in the winter of 2003. Basically, no snow, no race.

This little story has ideas for the best home businesses in dealing with people you come across in your own business.

The making money ideas here are that if you can motivate your associates, they will in turn, work hard for you and make you money.

“Throw down a challenge,” is what Dale Carnegie says to do when nothing else works.

Photo above shows momentos that Nenana Volunteer Gene Jensen brought home after the exhausting work of helping Nenana host the Number One Checkpoint for the 2003 Iditarod race.
Photo above shows momentos that Nenana Volunteer Gene Jensen brought home after the exhausting work of helping Nenana host the Number One Checkpoint for the 2003 Iditarod race.

Mr. Carnegie was referring to people who can’t get other people to do what they want. He says that people are motivated by work if it is exciting and interesting, more than by money.

Although the 2003 Iditarod situation is a bit of a spin-off on his reference to people who can’t get other people to work, the race that year definitely demonstrates that people are motivated to work hard if the work is exciting and interesting, and not just for the money.

While a non-profit, non-profits are still businesses, and this one has employees and a boss in addition to contractors and sponsors, and many, many volunteers.

The Iditarod Trail is the route that dog teams in the early 1900’s ran life-saving serum to an Epidemic in Nome. This epic journey is what inspired the start of what has become Alaska’s most popular dog race.

While the Anchorage based business was reluctant to admit that they would have to move the race route, others were jumping at the bit to host the race.

Residents of the village of Nenana, the site of the inspiration for the race, being the historical site of where the Iditarod Trail starts, wanted to host the start of the race, but just north of Nenana is the city of Fairbanks.

When Iditarod began looking at a possible Fairbanks restart, they weren’t sure what kind of response they might get, said Stan Hooley, as quoted by Mark Evans in his online article “2003 Iditarod Begins in Fairbanks”.

Stan Hooley was the executive director of the Iditarod Trail Committee in 2003.

Fairbanks Mayor Steve Thompson told them that Fairbanks would make all the resources available to them, the article states.

 

Other articles published in February and March of 2003 all concur that the response from volunteers wanting to help with the race was more than abundant.

When all was said and done, both Fairbanks, Nenana, and several other villages along the trail went above and beyond to welcome and help in any way they could to make sure that the 2003 race was a huge success.

The challenge that was thrown out was spurred by the reputation of the race itself, not by a boss or manager, but the result of an exciting and challenging job was met and exceeded more than the worried exec in Anchorage may have dreamed.

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